Month: March 2021

Scientists have discovered a new genetic disease, which causes some children’s brains to develop abnormally, resulting in delayed intellectual development and often early onset cataracts. The majority of patients with the condition, which is so new it doesn’t have a name yet, we’re also microcephalic, a birth defect where a baby’s head is smaller than
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Scientists at UC San Francisco, UC Berkeley and UCLA have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to jointly launch an early phase, first-in-human clinical trial of a CRISPR gene correction therapy in patients with sickle cell disease using the patient’s own blood-forming stem cells. The trial will combine CRISPR technology developed at Innovative Genomics
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Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center have developed a new framework for different factors influencing how a child’s brain is “wired” to learn to read before kindergarten. This may help pediatric providers identify risks when the brain is most responsive to experiences and interventions. This “eco-bio-developmental” model of emergent literacy, described in the journal
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Image: Shutterstock IN THIS ARTICLE Inflammation of the pancreas is called pancreatitis. The pancreas is a gland located behind the stomach. It contains exocrine cells making digestive enzymes for digestion and endocrine glands producing hormones, such as insulin and glucagon, for glucose metabolism. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Acute pancreatitis is a sudden and
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Too often, contends UMass Lowell faculty researcher Brenna Morse, children with complex chronic medical conditions spend days in the hospital undergoing tests for what could be a simple diagnosis. The challenges include, she says, some children with medical complexities, such as severe neurological conditions and functional impairments, cannot easily signal that they are in pain
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About 61% of Americans have had at least one Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE), experts’ formal term for a traumatic childhood event. ACEs–which may include abuse, neglect and severe household dysfunction–often lead to psychological and social struggles that reach into adulthood, making ACEs a major public health challenge. But the long-term consequences of ACEs are just
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The “terrible twos” got nothin’ on life with a “threenager” ’ or so parents of 3-year-olds would have you believe. It may seem surprising that someone so small could pack so much attitude, but threenagers prove it’s possible with their angst and emotional volatility. For parents dealing with this phase, Twitter offers a welcome escape.
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